Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched: A History of Folk Horror

2021

Action / Documentary / Horror

14
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 100% · 50 reviews
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 86%
IMDb Rating 7.6/10 10 1678 1.7K

Top cast

Emma Tammi as Self
Ian Ogilvy as Self
Alice Lowe as Self
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1.72 GB
1280*714
English 2.0
NR
Subtitles us  
23.976 fps
3 hr 12 min
Seeds 5
3.2 GB
1920*1072
English 2.0
NR
Subtitles us  
23.976 fps
3 hr 12 min
Seeds 14
1.73 GB
1280*714
English 2.0
NR
Subtitles us  
24 fps
3 hr 12 min
Seeds 4
3.2 GB
1920*1072
English 2.0
NR
Subtitles us  
24 fps
3 hr 12 min
Seeds 7

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by masonallen-68559 8 / 10

Informative and Entertaining

An outstanding look at the folk horror subgenre. There's lots here I didn't know and it's fun to watch and make a list of all the films you've yet to see, because I can promise you that there will be many you've never even heard of from all sorts of countries. The film is over 3 hours which might make it a bad idea for one seat viewing, but it's just as good if you want to watch it in smaller portions.

Reviewed by jellopuke 8 / 10

Exhaustive and informative

There's a lot packed into 3 hours here and while some of it is repetitive, you will definitely see a ton of movies to add to your to watch list. It might have been better served to be a series with different episodes focusing on different countries, but overall it's still a rich source of information and films, so worth checking out.

Reviewed by insect-09018 6 / 10

important but flawed

Beautiful to look at - the films under discussion are a beguiling bunch and there is some killer montage. I am the proverbial viewer who is happy to sit through 3 hrs plus on his subject. Unfortunately, those hours don't fly by. It is overlong and badly paced. The commentators seem heavy handed, pompous and humourless. Really this film would have been better served as several seperate features - one on British Folk horror, one or more others on the legacies of the colonial past, voodoo, etc. Lacks a tangible central thesis - Candyman, with it's urban setting surely the antithesis of folk horror, is included, with the justification that it is rooted in 'urban legend'. Why not include Alligator then? Why not The Fog? Almost any Dracula movie could be valid, with it's old country curses and whatnot. More relevant, Straw Dogs and The Shout are passed over - neither obscure and extensively covered elsewhere, so not a great loss, but suggestive of the filmmakers wandering interest. At times pedantic (scouring back issues of film journals for fleeting refernces to folk horror, Jonathan Rigby claiming he coined the term) and undisciplined. The interpretations are valid, but expressed in atmosphere of suffocating academic waffling. This is hardly conducive to the mystic weirdness the films themselves exude. The old Linda Blair routine, 'fear-of-female-sexuality' is trotted out. Fear, yes, but thrilling fear! What else is a Horror film supposed to do? Blood On Satan's Claw pretends to decry mob hysteria - but the girls are unambiguously under the influence of a devil, and commit evil and cruel acts - not the best example if one is looking for well thought out social critique. Michael Hordern in 'Whistle and I'll Come, My Lad' is 'almost a symbol of the patriarchy', rather than a pompous and bumbling eccentric. His having encountered a ghost is here presumably secondary to his imagined abuses of power under his professorship. In a way, the assorted commentators resemble the academic protagonists of several films under discussion here - unable to let go and believe, fearful of their own voyeuristic fascinations and clothing them in the respectable manners of the day, unwilling to perceive the true nature of the object of their study until it is to late. It is crucial viewing for those with an interest in the subject because of the many excellent or interesting films covered, but the relentless, one-sided and heavy handed commentary really is wearying - regardless of whether one agrees or not. That said, prepare to add countless titles to your watch list - visually stunning examples from around the world. At heart the appeal of folk horror is the same as the fairy tales and legends culture springs from - the rigidity of modern society makes escape into a bucolic idyll ever more attractive - though for all the talk of matriarchial societies, it's likely that modern living has improved the lot of women considerably. A lot of those tales carried the cautionary message: 'don't stray from the well-worn path', at heart most of these films reiterate this message - unless they are revenge plots. And why do ghosts wait several generations before taking out their ire on the descendants of those who wronged them? Where's the justice in that?

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