Up in the Air

2009

Action / Comedy / Drama / Romance

104
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 90% · 288 reviews
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 79% · 100K ratings
IMDb Rating 7.4/10 10 349662 349.7K

Director

Top cast

Vera Farmiga as Alex Goran
Jason Bateman as Craig Gregory
Melanie Lynskey as Julie Bingham
George Clooney as Ryan Bingham
720p.BLU 720p.BLU 1080p.BLU 1080p.BLU 2160p.WEB.x265
700.29 MB
1280*720
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
1 hr 49 min
Seeds 34
1005.28 MB
1280*694
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
1 hr 49 min
Seeds 5
1.50 GB
1920*1080
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
1 hr 49 min
Seeds 71
2.02 GB
1920*1040
English 5.1
R
23.976 fps
1 hr 49 min
Seeds 17
4.88 GB
3840*2076
English 5.1
R
23.976 fps
1 hr 49 min
Seeds 36

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by vortex007 7 / 10

Subjective reality

Up In the Air takes us to the story about Ryan Bingham, respective man who flitting from city to city to sack employees, yes it's his job. I've never heard about such job so to my utterly astonishment I knew that some bosses are to gutless to do this themselves, so they hire such guys as Ryan Binghanm to do it. Ryan Bingham is a perfect guy, charming, seductive, smart, well-groomed and real gentleman. He's into juice when it's necessary, likes to talk in sarcastic and trenchant tone, has cynic attitude to almost every things in that life especially love and family. No doubt a lot of men dreaming about such life as he has.

Jason Reitman (the director of Up In the Air) tries to show that it's not right to be such kind of person. Because family and love are obviously the most important things (in his opinion of course). That's the main thing that disappointed me in Up In the Air. I had always assumed that no one knows what's the most relevant thing for every people in this world. If somebody wants to make family, OK no problem! Go on! If you want to be single, OK, go on! And nobody can blame anyone in wrong life attitude, cos it's impossible to prove which attitude is the most correct. Everybody choose his own way and it's his choice. Besides real life already proved that in most cases truly happy family it's a utopia and there is nothing to do with it.

So why Jason Reitman persistently tries to prove that's the only one way is right? Why? Why he shows us that we shouldn't neglect family and love? I don't understand it. If he thinks that everybody who hasn't got family is miserable I'd say he's seriously mistakes. He can't decide for over the 6 billiards of people. Everyone have his own view on happiness. And badly that such idea in dozens of movies brainwash the public and make them to do what they don't want in fact. I'm happy that at least George Clooney's hero eventually remained single and proceeded his travel around US. Surely such move deserves accolade because it's quite uncommon element of Hollywood movies when love story line ends tragically. No expected happy-end, that's the only one reason I loved the film.

Clooney's elegant veneer great as always but it hasn't satiric reflection, his jokes, are quite amusing and make you chuckle occasionally, but nothing special. Comedy is not the strongest side of this work. Anyway it's a good movie to ponder about life in a deep sense of it, but at my point spectator shouldn't instantly take a side of the director here, spectator just need to realize that our life has different ways and nobody can blame if you choose another one instead of typical family path.

Reviewed by harbor21usa 8 / 10

A Really Good Flick With One Serious Flaw

01-08-10 "Up in the Air" is a thoughtful and satisfying entertainment. I'm a big fan of the team of creative artists who made it happen. It's an amazing work of art from auteur, Jason Reitman. All the more impressive is the fact that he's only thirty-two. All of these kudos notwithstanding, I want to briefly address the character of Alex because therein lies a serious flaw. I'm not confirmed in my opinion, however, so I want to put it out here for possible contradiction.

Early in the second act, Alex (Vera Farmiga) starts showing palpable signs of falling in love with Ryan (George Clooney): her eyes, facial expressions and energy feel to me like a woman not only falling in love, but also a woman actively (although not verbally) seeking a deeper emotional bond and commitment. This culminates in the conversation with Natalie (Anna Kendrick), when Alex talks about the importance of marriage, children and home.

After Ryan and Alex attend his sister Julie's (Melanie Lynskey) wedding, Ryan is seeing clearly the emptiness of his jet-setting life and then, suddenly, he stops mid-sentence during one of his lectures and rushes to Chicago to see Alex; I think there's a marriage proposal balancing on the tip of his tongue.

Was Ryan primed for this change of attitude by recent events? Yes. Were the looks, expressions, energies and statements of Alex an important part of this priming? Yes.

When the big reveal happens, and Alex is uncovered as a committed wife and mother who only wants side-action with Ryan, I thought to myself, as the writer and director, Jason Reitman has exaggerated and simplified the transparency of Alex's feelings for Ryan in order to insure that the big reveal plays as a reversal that packs a wallop. This wallop, I think, comes at the expense of the psychological realism and moral validity of Alex.

Please consider an alternate second act in which the character of Alex is a bit more complicated: If Alex is morally and emotionally sound, and I think the movie wants us to feel that, for the most part, she is, then I don't think she would actively solicit a deepening emotional commitment with Alex without informing him that she's unavailable for marriage. A failure to do so is the self-centered, unscrupulous behavior of a rat. Likewise, denying this moral responsibility with a reference to Ryan's commitment to bachelorhood is a flimsy rationalization. It's entirely possible that Alex finds the force of her emotions such that she cannot help moving towards a deepening of emotional feeling for Ryan. However, as a decent person, I think she would have a deep internal conflict with this emotional trend. Of course this internal conflict and holding back by Alex would be detected by Ryan. Quite possibly, Alex would reach the apex of her internal conflict during the wedding, when she sees Ryan turning away from his confirmed bachelorhood towards a union with her. In turn, Ryan might interpret this behavior as a conflict about Alex's desire to maintain her single lifestyle. From here, the movie might show how Ryan, after the influence of his sister's wedding, flip-flops and becomes the person pursuing marriage while the woman resists. The through-line of cavalier good will and humor would be easily maintained by Ryan because he thinks he knows why Alex is resisting and then - Blam! - Ryan goes to Chicago on impulse and discovers the truth.

With this version, the reveal still packs a wallop, Alex remains a somewhat decent person, the psychology of her behavior remains valid and there's no telltale intrusion by the writer-director.

Reviewed by SnoopyStyle 7 / 10

Great character movie

Ryan Bingham (George Clooney) is a professional hatchet man who fires people as a job. He is an expert flyer who gives lectures about how to pack for travel. He's good at his job and his most joyful goal is to attain ten million frequent flyer miles. He meets his perfect flying partner Alex Goran (Vera Farmiga) at an airport bar. He deliberately avoids a personal life and his spartan apartment. His sister wants him to photograph a cutout of his niece and her fiancée at different places for their upcoming wedding. Natalie Keener (Anna Kendrick) is a new hire with a new way to fire people by telecommunication. Bingham is dismayed at the proposal. His boss Craig Gregory (Jason Bateman) forces him to show Keener the ropes.

Clooney and Farmiga have a fun cerebral chemistry. They flirt well together. It's too bad that they can't be on screen more often. Kendrick is great at playing the uptight cute girl. She has a good fun mentor relationship with Clooney. It has some funny moments. The best is when the three leads finally get together. Kendrick in that scene is hilarious. Jason Reitman deftly handles these three characters beautifully. I'm not as enamored with the wedding section. It comes after Kendrick having such great scenes and then she's gone. Farmiga is back but the wedding takes too much attention away from her. The movie reaches a high point with the three leads coming together. I think the movie should have kept up that pace and the wedding took some of the steam out.

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