Corsage

2022 [GERMAN]

Biography / Drama / History

17
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 86% · 159 reviews
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 59% · 100 ratings
IMDb Rating 6.6/10 10 9804 9.8K

Director

Top cast

Colin Morgan as Bay Middleton
Vicky Krieps as Empress Elisabeth
Florian Teichtmeister as Emperor Franz Joseph
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU 720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
1.02 GB
1280*536
German 2.0
NR
24 fps
1 hr 54 min
Seeds 6
2.1 GB
1920*804
German 5.1
NR
24 fps
1 hr 54 min
Seeds 18
1.02 GB
1280*534
German 2.0
NR
24 fps
1 hr 53 min
Seeds 3
2.1 GB
1920*800
German 5.1
NR
24 fps
1 hr 53 min
Seeds 3

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by boblipton 4 / 10

Annoying Movie

Empress Elizabeth of Austria-Hungary (Vicky Krieps) blows out all the candles on her 40th birthday cake in 1878, and everyone tells her how young she looks. She doesn't feel young. At a time when half her female subjects wouldn't make it to her age, when she eats so little a wren would starve, and the maids are too weak to cinch her corset tight enough, she's grown bored with the court, bored with the pretty clothes. She takes frequent trips out of the country, like her journey to Britain, where she founders her favorite horse and Louis LePrince (Finnegan Oldfield) makes motion pictures using his new technology of a roll of film. She's had enough. So she takes the cross-Channel ferry back home...

Marie Kreutzer's film is an absolute mess of contradictions, full of deliberate anachronisms in technology and music, and ultimately offering a wide-ranging and contradictory series of conclusions. No, this is not the Empress Elizabeth portrayed by Romy Scheider in the Sissi trilogy. Yet once you've gotten past that point, what has this movie got to say, and whom is it saying it to? It's awful being a 40-year-old woman in 19th century Austria, even if you are the Empress? Ok. Is she mad, and can't get proper mental help? Ok. Is she deserving of our sympathy? A definite no to that, since she verbally abuses the servants, and as to what she does to Jeanne Werner....

So what is the point of a movie like this, other than to shoot in some beautiful settings, and get good performances out of fine actors? Is it to serve as a corrective to Ernst Marischka's spun-sugar take on the Empress? That came out seventy years ago. If the purpose is to tell a more truthful story, then why the insistence of untruthful details, like a harpist playing "Help Me Make It Through The Night"? Surely anyone interested enough in the life of a woman who was assassinated in 1898 would be as put off by the deliberately wrong details as I am.

I suppose the answer is that this movie was not made for me. It's true enough, but film is not an artistic medium in which the creators seek out a patron who will pay for everything. A film needs a mass audience, and that audience has to talk it up. For that last purpose, include me out.

Reviewed by Xstal 6 / 10

Waisted...

Life begins at forty, or so they say, so much living to enjoy from that big day, you can starve yourself to death, injecting drugs, to reduce stress, seduce your cousin, to find he doesn't want to play. As an Empress, you have everything you want, the world outside wants to see what you have to flaunt, but you like to use a double, can't be bothered with the trouble, and you've cut your hair, to ridicule and taunt. It's been observed, that you've become, a little vain, look for compliments, to take away the pain, your husband's disengaged, you often cause him some outrage, you have disdain that you suck in, and then constrain.

Great performance from the wonderful Vicky Krieps but if you're not a huge fan of the character or the era you may find it a little less engaging than you might like.

Reviewed by ella-48 8 / 10

Art, not history

I've noticed a number of reviewers having difficulty with this film on grounds of its historical inaccuracy. I can't speak to any of that. Being myself blissfully ignorant of the relevant history, I was untroubled by such considerations as I settled into my seat at my local Picture House - perfectly happy to take it as Art: a work of speculative fiction, and a somewhat impressionistic one at that.

Treating it as such, I found it thoroughly engrossing: 1hr 54 well spent, IMO. The central performance by Vicky Krieps is wholly engaging and deliciously subtle, and its portrayal of an intelligent, creative spirit struggling to maintain sanity against a straitjacket (or should that be corset? That's the big metaphor, after all) of patriarchal social convention had me hook, line and sinker, from the opening scene to the (breathtakingly unexpected) final one.

In the interests of full disclosure might as well mention the two things I was less keen on. Neither of them deal-breakers, but...

1) In a couple of scenes, characters are heard singing late 20th century pop songs. This practice of inserting anachronistic modern detail into period drama has become a bit of a fad in the last few years, especially, it seems, in German productions (the recent TV series KaDeWe springs to mind as a prime example). My personal feeling is that it's a stylistic quirk that's been done to death and has outlived its welcome. Others may disagree!

2) One part of the story (we are told by the onscreen captions) takes place in "Northamptonshire". Yeah right. Northamptonshire my ***! Neither the architecture nor the scenery are remotely British. It's blatantly obvious that these scenes were shot, like the rest of the movie, in mainland Europe - most likely southern Germany or Austria. Perhaps the production budget wouldn't stretch to a trip across the channel? Ah well...

These minor niggles aside, though, I'm glad I went to see this movie. Its imagery will linger in my consciousness a long time. If you're debating whether or not to buy that ticket, I'd say go for it. :)

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