Alma's Rainbow

1994

Comedy / Drama

1
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 81% · 16 reviews
IMDb Rating 6.5/10 10 203 203

Director

Top cast

720p.BLU 1080p.BLU 720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
820.15 MB
1280*690
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 29 min
Seeds 8
1.65 GB
1920*1036
English 5.1
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 29 min
Seeds 9
823.81 MB
1280*690
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 29 min
Seeds 4
1.49 GB
1920*1036
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 29 min
Seeds 5

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by boblipton 6 / 10

Her Sister From Paris

One not-so-little sister went to Paris to be in show business, and one stayed home in Brooklyn to run her own hair salon and raise her daughter. Now her sister from Paris is back in Brooklyn, her daughter is becoming a woman, and life has gotten very confusing.

Ayoka Chenzira's movie about how life will go on, no matter how hard you try to stop it is a mixed bag. It meets all the technical issues of a good movie, and the story is a good one. The main problem for me is Mizan Kirby as the wandering sister; I suppose she should be played a bit larger than life in the opening scenes, but it keeps up too long and is phony; she enunciates her French far too carefully, like she is in a class room, after ten years in Paris; and she does the same for the sequences in which she is in a slap-up argument with her sister, Kim Weston-Moran.

Even so, I found the movie well worth watching. There's some life in daughter Victoria Gabrielle Platt as she tries to come to terms with her adult body, despite the old ladies who brew tisanes for her, her mother's stoic advice, and her aunt's challenges. Also the secondary characters like Lee Dobson who tries to put some life into Miss Weston, and Jennifer Copeland as the salon's assistant is a warily watchful presence.

Reviewed by tsalagi 9 / 10

A gem of a film

Alma's Rainbow is a rich, multi-layered film about Black American life that is all too rare.

Unlike many films about African-Americans, the characters of Alma's Rainbow are fully-developed and center around Rainbow and her transformation into womanhood. She is straying from the straight and narrow path that her pragmatic mother, Alma, would have her follow when along comes her Aunt Ruby, a stylish lounge singer with more ambition than talent. In Rainbow's inexperienced eyes, Ruby has reached the plateau of success that Rainbow dreams of. The film focuses on the conflict that ensues between sisters Alma and Ruby and Rainbow's decisions about her future.

Before Rainbow was born, Alma's and Ruby's were a singing duo named The Flamingo Sisters. Alma career was cut short by the arrival of Rainbow, so she opens a day spa named the Flamingo Parlor while Ruby goes off to Paris to perform Josephine Baker impersonations. After they part ways, Ruby becomes even more decadent and free-spirited while Alma becomes more conservative. The story does not mention Rainbow's father, but it hints that Alma is reluctant to engage in a new relationship because of a painful past experience.

The acting is all around well done. The characters are all buoyant and funny. At first glance, Victoria Gabriella Platt seems a bit old for the part of Rainbow. She is an obviously well-developed young woman, not a child on the edge of puberty. The director makes a wise decision in casting her because she reflects all of the emotions and inner turmoil that Rainbow is feeling with her expressive face and body language. I also must mention Lee Dobson's great use of his eyes as Alma's love interest. I particularly admired Kim Weston-Moran's sangfroid in her performance as Alma. She underplays the role which balances out Mizan Nunez's wild portrayal of Ruby. My only real criticism is that the film does not fully explore Ruby's characterization. Despite her obvious materialism and irresponsibility, Ruby but does not come across as shallow. I longed to discover what really motivates her and makes her tick.

The visual representation of Alma's Rainbow is very creative without being gimmicky. There are colorful, balloon-filled parties, stylish costumes and ever-changing hairstyles. The cinematography captures the unique beauty of Brooklyn with Manhattan skylines, lush green parks, and the rich woods and tall ceilings of Alma's brownstone. Throughout the film, the image of a hot pink flower represents Alma's repressed passion. There are also flashbacks to the Flamingo Sisters in their heyday that are juxtaposed to the present as silent shots in black and white. There are also shots of Rainbow's romantic fantasies of an interlude with an older soldier as she explores her awakening sexuality.

The musical elements of this film are also a treat. Hip-hop, slow jams, and a fantastic main theme of smooth strains of the alto sax are edited to compliment the visual presentation masterfully.

On every level, this movie is fantastic and fun to watch again and again.

Reviewed by Jalea 9 / 10

A Nice Slice of African American Life with a Caribbean Flavor

Alma's owns a beauty salon, which is located in the first floor of her brownstone. Alma has to come to terms with her past as she struggles to keep her daughter from making the same mistake, she made some years ago. Her daughter, Rainbow, struggles with puberty (some may find it hard to believe, however, there are young girls that are that well developed in their early teens).

In the midst of Rainbow's struggle with puberty and it's social implications, Ruby, Alma's sister shows up unannounced. Wild and free Ruby changes both Alma and Rainbow as she encourages Alma to loosen up and Rainbow to follow her dreams. It is a nice movie.

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